CPGs (Clinical Practice Guidelines)

AMDA’s clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) have become the standard care process in the post-acute and long-term care (PA/LTC) setting.

AMDA CPGs can reduce: costs, avoidable transfers, and risk of survey penalty and litigation. Most importantly, AMDA CPGs can improve: patient outcomes, and safety of staff, facility, and patients.

With the implementation of MDS 3.0 and the new Care Area Assessment (CAA), facilities will need to show they are using evidence based and expert endorsed resources. Appendix C in the new MDS Manual references the AMDA CPGs. Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) State Operations Manual references AMDA CPGs.

AMDA CPGs emphasize key care processes and are organized for ready incorporation into facility-specific policies and procedures to guide staff and practitioner practices and performance. CPG implementation follows the medical care process of recognition, assessment (root cause analysis), treatment (based on assessment), and monitoring. Be able to make the case for unavoidable situations and conditions. Know that you can better manage a condition. Know that you can provide quality care for your residents!

CPGs are available in print and electronic formats, and sold individually or in multiples.

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Newly updated, the Pressure Ulcers and Other Wounds CPG now includes information regarding arterial and venous ulcers, in addition to pressure ulcers, as well as the new NPUAP staging terminology. Pressure ulcers and other wounds remain a major...
Parkinson’s Disease (PD) is a progressive, degenerative neurologic disorder. Although there is no known cure for PD, treatment can often prolong the patient’s life, improve mobility and function, and enhance dignity and quality of life. Early...
This package includes the Pain Management Clinical Practice Guideline, and the Pain Management Pocket Guide. Pain is common in the post-acute and long-term care setting (PALTC) setting. As many as 80% of LTC patients have at least one condition...
The aging process, the postmenopausal state, low calcium intake, lack of physical activity, and other risk factors predispose the elderly to low bone mass. Most elderly nursing facility patients have age-related changes in bones, resulting in a...
This package includes the Heart Failure Clinical Practice Guideline, and the Heart Failure Pocket Guide. Heart failure is one of the most common reasons for new or recurrent hospitalizations among persons over 65 years of age. Considerable progress...
Health maintenance in post-acute and long-term care (PALTC) settings incorporates systemic, proactive approaches that promote patients’ physical, emotional, psychological, cognitive, and functional integrity. Early detection and prevention of...
Although aging has relatively minimal effects on gastrointestinal (GI) function, age-related changes can cause or contribute to several GI disorders. Aging can result in impaired function of the gastric mucosal barrier and increased risk of peptic...
This tool guides physicians, other practitioners, and staff in assessing and managing individuals who have a recent history of falls or who are at risk of falling. This CPG will help identify ways to modify some of the risk factors for falls, as...
Depressive symptoms are common among older adults and can have a major effect on their quality of life. It has been estimated that between 12 and 16% of older adults living in post-acute and long-term care (PALTC) facilities have major depression...
Dementia, a disorder characterized by progressive decline in multiple areas of cognitive function, causes a range of cognitive, mood, behavioral, and functional impairments. Optimal management of dementia involves the entire interdisciplinary team,...