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Caring for the Ages
December 1, 2018

Several years ago, Caring for the Ages introduced this column to help encourage the best possible communication between practitioners and patients/families in post-acute and long-term care on a wide range of topics. We gathered a prestigious group of patient advocates, practitioners, and family members to craft a column that would meet this goal. The result was Caring for Consumers. This month’s column, authored by long-time contributing writer Joanne Kaldy, whose mother was an assisted living facility and nursing home resident, focuses on how to keep the communication channels open and...

Caring for the Ages
December 1, 2018

In an exclusive interview with Caring for the Ages, Jasen Gundersen, MD, MBA, president of TeamHealth’s Hospitalist and Post-Acute Care service lines, spoke with Ian Cordes, a member of Caring’s Editorial Advisory Board, about the increasing role of hospitalists in the United States. Dr. Gundersen explained how this development has changed the practice of medicine in the acute and post-acute settings, as well as discussed the evolution of TeamHealth, the influence of electronic medical record (EMR) systems on the day-to-day, and more.

Caring for the Ages
December 1, 2018

Whether you are interested in education and continuing medical education credits, webinars and other online programming, the latest research, podcasts featuring national experts, or you just want to connect with like-minded colleagues, Society membership is your answer. Renew or join today for benefits that include:

Caring for the Ages
December 1, 2018

The work we do — geriatrics and long-term care — always ranks high in job satisfaction when polls are taken. And yet ask any doctor you know, and he or she will tell you about one or two or four or more medical friends and colleagues who offed themselves along the way. I, myself, can think of six. They were gone from the lives of all who knew and loved them in an instant.

Caring for the Ages
December 1, 2018

Cathleen Dacey often participates in morning yoga and stretching programs at the assisted living facility where she lives. She is the youngest participant, but not just by a few years — Ms. Dacey is in her 20s. She is attending the law school at Quinnipiac University and is part of the student-in-residence program at Masonic Care at Ashlar Village in Connecticut.

Caring for the Ages
December 1, 2018

In addition to improving communication ability, a 12-week music intervention relieved apathy among older residents with dementia in a nursing facility in the People’s Republic of China. By comparison, the control group demonstrated similar or worsened effects in the same symptoms of apathy, including “decreased goal-oriented motor behavior, decreased goal-oriented cognition, and decreased affective reaction.”

Caring for the Ages
December 1, 2018

It’s 2 a.m. and the buzzing of a bed alarm signals that Mrs. Jones is getting up to go to the bathroom. Now alerted, staff can assist her and keep her safe. That is the ideal that makes bed and chair alarms part of many facilities’ fallprevention programs.

Caring for the Ages
December 1, 2018

Mrs. H and her husband are residents at a skilled nursing facility. They are elderly and have extensive gait instability, but are cognitively intact. Mr. H is rehabilitating after a compression fracture of the thoracic spine. They are both receiving physical therapy and occupational therapy. After rehab, Mr. H is discharged home to the community to live with his adult children, but his wife must remain in the SNF. Every day after his discharge, Mr. H visits his wife and wants to walk with her in the hallways like they used to do when they both resided at the SNF together.

Caring for the Ages
December 1, 2018

Many of Caring’s readers will recall the November, 2017 letter to the New England Journal of Medicine (2017;377:2192–2193) that recounted the case of an unidentified 70-year-old man who presented, unconscious and very ill, to an emergency department and was found to have a large “DO NOT RESUSCITATE” tattoo on his chest. Beneath that tattoo was a second tattoo, a representation of his signature. The patient received moderately aggressive life-sustaining treatment in an intensive care unit to address acidosis and hypotension, and the treating ICU team elected not to honor the tattoo...

Caring for the Ages
December 1, 2018

Editor’s note: The new content on this page, Expert Perspective, underscores the lasting relevance of the issue discussed in this previously published column.